Zoleveke: A Scientist Motivated by Personal Experience

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BORN and raised in Malaita province, Hilda Zoleveke left her home village to pursue education and a medical career as a medical Laboratory scientist at the Pathology Division of the National Referral Hospital in Honiara.
Medical Laboratory Scientists (MLS) and Medical Laboratory Technicians (MLT) — also known as Clinical Laboratory Scientists (CLS) — perform laboratory tests on patient samples to provide information needed to diagnose or monitor treatment.
Mrs Zoleveke after completed her high school, she later went on to study medicine at the School of Medicine, University of South Pacific (USP).
“To be a medical worker was my dream career, since studying in high school I loved studying science.
“I chose to become a medical worker because I want help cure sick people from their sicknesses and also help people get to know about their health status so they can live according to what medical workers have to tell them about their health condition.
“Working with medicines and sick people is really interesting. I learn more about medicines and what sicknesses they cure and how the medicine works to cure sicknesses
“I work very closely with doctors. My work mainly involve diagnostic laboratory testing and determine which antibiotic is required to save someone’s life,” Mrs Zoleveke told Solomon Women Newspaper.
Hilda started her career since 1987 and to reach this year would be 32 years. Although she might experience challenges in her work and home setting, she has managed to overcome them and committed for the love of her career and her family.
“I have faced many challenges during the span of my career as a medical laboratory technician at the National Referral Hospital.
“Most times, I had to work overtime and when it comes to emergency situations at the hospital, I had to attend to them therefore I usually didn’t have much time with my children and grandchildren but as a widow I had tried my best to manage my family and work,” she said.
Hilda lost her husband (Peter Zoleveke) in 2014.
To conduct diagnostic laboratory testing in a clinical environment, like a hospital laboratory. The country absolutely needs a certified or licensed as a medical laboratory scientist (MLS) or medical laboratory technician (MLT).
“I want to encourage our youths of today to consider the profession of a laboratory technician. The job is very interesting and exciting despite having its own challenges. If you want to be a hero to save lives remember to take up your future studies in medical science.
“It is very encouraging to know that the Solomon Islands Government (SIG) are sponsoring many of our human resources in our national university and at universities abroad. Some of the medical students are currently assisting the staffs at the hospital.
“I am thinking of retiring very soon and to see young energetic laboratory technicians taking up the role is a significant achievement for the country’s health sector,” she added.
She started working since 1987 and reaching this year, she now worked and served for thirty years now.
“I chose to become a medical worker because I want help sick people cured from their sicknesses and also help people get to know about their help statuses so they can live according to what medical workers have to tell them about their health.
“Working with medicines and sick people is really interesting as I get to learn more about medicines, what sicknesses they cure and how thee medicines work cure sicknesses,” Mrs. Zoleveke said.
She also helped other doctors in doing diagnoses and she finds it really interesting, she loves being a medical worker.
When asked about challenges she faced in her career she said most of the time she had to work overtime and when it comes to emergencies, she had to attend to them therefore she usually didn’t have much time with her children but as a widow she had tried her best to manage her family and work.
“I am happy that the country is the Solomon Islands Government (sIG) is educating many our human resources at the National University and abroad.
“Some of the products are now here to help us with this work and as for me, I am thinking of retiring soon and so nowadays I am starting to hand over the work to the new ones,” she said.
Mrs. Zoleveke is encouraging our youths today about the job as interesting and exciting despite the challenges.
“You want to be a hero, be a medical worker and save lives”.